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WELSH BUSINESS SHARES TOP TIPS FOR EXPORTING IN NEW PODCAST SERIES

Department for International Trade launches new podcast with leading UK entrepreneurs to explore why exporting is GREAT for business

The six-part podcast series is hosted by Nick Hewer, Lord Sugar’s former adviser on The Apprentice

Exports of goods from Wales increased by 3.0% to £16.9 billion in the year ending September 2018

Cardiff-based technology firm Sure Chill will feature in a six-part podcast series launched by the Department for International Trade as part of the government’s ‘Exporting is GREAT’ campaign.

In 2011, the company developed a cooling technology to protect life-saving vaccines in developing countries. Their medical refrigerators can last without power for up to 12 days and have since protected 20 million vaccinations around the world.

Launched this January, the ‘Local to Global’ podcast series features some of the UK’s leading entrepreneurs sharing top tips for growing a business on the world stage. The podcast is hosted by Nick Hewer – famously known for his appearance on The Apprentice as one of Lord Sugar’s advisers.

Sure Chill’s life-changing refrigerators are improving healthcare and living conditions in countries across Africa and Asia – especially those without reliable power. The company currently exports to over 50 countries including Kenya, Nigeria, Mali, Pakistan and Nepal, with plans to enter new markets in South America and the Gulf states.

Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion Baroness Fairhead said:

“Sure Chill’s success in Africa and Asia highlights how exporting can improve the lives of those in developing countries thousands of miles away. It’s stories like this that inspire other UK businesses to explore overseas markets, and I’m pleased my department has been able to help Sure Chill deliver its life-saving refrigerators internationally.

“As demand for British goods worldwide continues to grow, we stand ready to support businesses in Wales and across the UK looking to explore overseas markets. I would encourage likeminded businesses to listen to the ‘Local to Global’ podcast and hear first-hand the stories of businesses on their export experience.”

Since launching its first product in 2011, Sure Chill has experienced international success and now plans to use the same cooling technology for domestic use in homes, retail, businesses and even airlines.

The business gained greater publicity last year when CEO Nigel Saunders accompanied the UK Prime Minister on her trade mission across Africa to promote their technology and build trade links. Not only does the company work closely with UNICEF and the World Health Organization, it has also received funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Shell Foundation.

Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns said:

“Innovative businesses like Sure Chill, who joined my recent trip to Africa with the Prime Minister, are contributing to a stronger Welsh economy, and I am delighted to see their success in the global marketplace. It’s encouraging for other Welsh companies to hear from those who have expanded their business internationally.

“There has never been a better time for Welsh companies to export to new markets. The UK Government is supporting Welsh businesses as they begin their export journey, whether that’s with financial support, attending overseas trade shows or connecting them with international buyers.”

Sure Chill CEO Nigel Saunders will appear on Episode 4 of the ‘Local to Global’ podcast which goes live on 4 February 2019, and is available on all major podcast platforms including iTunes, Spotify and Acast.

Nigel Saunders, Chief Executive Officer at Sure Chill, said:

“We’re proud to be featured in the ‘Local to Global’ podcast. It’s great to share our experience with other businesses knowing that it might give them the confidence to begin exporting.

“Exporting has always been part of our business plan because the nature of our product means that the people who would benefit the most are in developing economies.