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1 in 7 children of Zika-infected mums have problems

One out of every seven babies born to US mothers who were infected with Zika during pregnancy developed some kind of health problem, according to the first long-term look at those children.   Tuesday’s study focused on the children of women in Puerto Rico and other territories, where most of the US cases were seen when the disease swept across ...

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Highly lethal viruses can hijack cellular defences against cancer: Study

A lethal virus has been discovered, which has the capability of hijacking cellular defence against cancer.   The recently-discovered Henipaviruses, considered to be highly lethal, can hijack cellular defences against cancer. They are among the deadliest viruses known to man and have no effective treatments.  The viruses include Hendra, lethal to humans and horses, and the Nipah virus, a serious ...

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New Ebola outbreak in DRC

The latest Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has put its neighboring countries on alert with the World Health Organization (WHO) saying tackling the epidemic would be “complex.”   On July 24, WHO had declared an official end to the Ebola outbreak in DRC but within a week, the epidemic made a comeback with a fresh ...

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Imbalance in pH levels may cause Alzheimer’s disease: Study

Imbalance in pH value may be a cause of Alzheimer’s disease, a study has found.   A study conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists have found new evidence in lab-grown mouse brain cells, called astrocytes, that one root of Alzheimer’s disease may be a simple imbalance in acid-alkaline-or pH-chemistry inside endosomes, the nutrient and chemical cargo shuttles in cells.  Astrocytes ...

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Alcohol increase death risk in young TB patients

Increased consumption of alcohol in people with tuberculosis (TB) may accelerate their risk of death, scientists led by an Indian-origin researcher have found.   Chronic alcohol consumption modulates a host of immune defense mechanisms and increases susceptibility to infections with various pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) — the TB-causing bacterium.  In the study, the risk was seen in young ...

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Low levels of air pollution linked to changes in the heart

Regular exposure to even low levels of air pollution may cause changes to the heart similar to those in the early stages of heart failure, experts say. A study of 4,000 people in the UK found those who lived by loud, busy roads had larger hearts on average than those living in less polluted areas.   This was despite the ...

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Laparoscopic kidney transplantation successfully held at Dhaka CMH

 Successful kidney transplantations of two patients in laparoscopic method held at Combined Military Hospital (CMH) in the capital for the first time.   India’s Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) Kidney Transplant Surgeon Dr. Pranjal Rohon Lal Modi led the operation, said a press release from Inter Services Public Relation (ISPR) Directorate.  A seven-member Indian specialists’ team, urologist ...

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Being inactive could lead to type 2 diabetes

Inactivity for two straight weeks among older overweight people increases the risk of type 2 diabetes.   Not only did an abrupt, brief period of inactivity hasten the onset of the disease and elevate blood sugar levels among pre-diabetic patients, but researchers reported that some study participants did not fully recover when they returned to normal activity for two weeks.  ...

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Hair loss gene could improve cancer immunotherapy: Study

 Harnessing the gene behind hair loss could help improve cancer immunotherapy.   A study by Columbia University Irving Medical Center researchers confirmed the possibility. “While immunotherapies have shown great promise in cancer, most patients do not benefit from these treatments because their tumours are able to evade the immune system,” said a lead researcher, Angela M. Christiano.  “But one way ...

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Japan human trial tests iPS cell treatment for Parkinson’s

Japanese researchers on Monday announced the first human trial using a kind of stem cell to treat Parkinson’s disease, building on earlier animal trials.   The research team at Kyoto University plans to inject five million induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells — which have the potential to develop into any cell in the body — into patient brains, the university ...

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