Home / Life Style / Tips to keep skin healthy and glowing

Tips to keep skin healthy and glowing

Tips to keep skin healthy and glowing
A glowing, smooth and healthy-looking skin is every one’s dream.

Dr. Nitika Nijhara, Consultant Dermatologist, BLK-Max multi-specialty hospital in New Delhi, India, discussed the role of diet in skincare:

  1. We need collagen and elastin and should consume proteins such as chickpeas, eggs, lean meat etc.
  2. Vitamin C works as an antioxidant and helps with preventing early wrinkling.
  3. For skin hydration, one should consume vitamin A and beta carotene rich foods such as carrots, yellow and green vegetables, and whole milk.
  4. Vitamin E fights free radicals, which cause the ageing process of cells and skin. Foods rich in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, almonds and walnuts.

Caused of pimples: 

Pimples/acne are caused by overactive oil glands in the skin and a build-up of oil, dead skin cells and bacteria, which leads to inflammation (swelling and redness) in the pores.

How to keep pimples at bay?

One can keep pimples at bay by washing the face regularly with a foaming cleanser and use gel/water based skin products and also avoid scrubbing the face, Dr. Nitika Nijhara said.

What is the role of the CTMP regime in skincare?

The CTMP regime has been popularly known as cleansing, toning, moisturising and protecting. Last step to skincare routine is protection with sunscreen. The importance of this regime lies in keeping the skin’s PH in check, replenishing moisture and delaying visible signs of ageing.

How to maintain healthy skin during old age? 

  • In old age we should focus on using a gentle, non-irritating cleanser
  • Use a moisturiser with high viscosity as skin tends to get dry.
  • Sunscreen is of utmost importance at any age and retinol and vitamin C boosts skin’s elasticity in old age.
  • An acne prone oily skin person should use gel-based products.
  • Another mistake which people make is not regularly washing their makeup tools (brush/sponge blender, etc.) which tends to result in infection.

Source: The Statesman